Private Agri-food Standards: Supply Chains and the Governance of Standards

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.main##

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.sidebar##

Published Jun 4, 2013
Elizabeth Ransom Carmen Bain Vaughan Higgins

Abstract

The articles in this second special issue of the International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food on private agri-food standards consider key issues involved in the shift from government to governance within agri-food systems. The first special issue, published in February 2013, focused on ‘the contestation, hybridity and the politics of standards’ (Bain et al., 2013, p. 1). The articles in the first issue complicated our understanding of the relationship between public and private standards by examining the politics associated with their formation, implementation, and outcomes. At the same time, the first special issue drew attention to the diversity of private standards, and the spaces that exist – or get created – for actors to contest the values, content or outcomes of such standards. These are important themes, revisited in the second special issue. However, the concern with the politics of standards is extended through more systematic attention to the relationship between standards, certification, and the governance of agri-food supply chains.

How to Cite

[1]
Ransom, E. , Bain, C. and Higgins, V. 2013. Private Agri-food Standards: Supply Chains and the Governance of Standards . The International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food. 20, 2 (Jun. 2013), 147-154. DOI:https://doi.org/10.48416/ijsaf.v20i2.190.
Abstract 16 | PDF Downloads 15

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.details##

References
Ayres, I. and Braithwaite, J. (1992) Responsive Regulation: Transcending the Deregulation Debate. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bain, C., Ransom, E. and Higgins, V. (2013) Private agri-food standards: contestation, hybridity and the politics of standards, International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, 20(1), pp. 1–10.

Higgins, V. and Larner, W. (2010a) Standards and standardization as a social scientific problem, in: V. Higgins and w. Larner (eds) Calculating the Social: Standards and the Reconfiguration of Governing. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1–17.

Higgins, V. and Larner, W. (2010b) From standardization to standardizing work, in: V. Higgins and w. Larner (eds) Calculating the Social: Standards and the Reconfiguration of Governing. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 205–218.

Kimura, A. (2013) Standards as hybrid forum: comparison of the post-Fukushima radiation standards by a consumer cooperative, the private sector, and the Japanese government, International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food, 20(1), pp. 11–29.

Ponte, S., Gibbon, P. and Vestergaard, J. (2011a) Governing through standards: an introduction, in: s. Ponte, P. Gibbon and J. Vestergaard (eds) Governing through Standards: Origins, Drivers and Limitations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1–24.

Ponte, S., Gibbon, P. and Vestergaard, J. (2011b) Conclusion: the current status, limits and future of ‘governing through standards’, in: s.

Ponte, P. Gibbon and J. Vestergaard (eds) Governing through Standards: Origins, Drivers and Limitations. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 289–303.

Tamm hallström, K. and Boström, M. (2010) Transnational Multi-Stakeholder Standardization. Northhamp- ton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Utting, P. (2008) Rearticulating regulatory approaches: private-public authority and cooperate social responsibility, in: V. Rittberger and M. Nettesheim (eds) Authority in the Global Political Economy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 241–274
Section
Editorial Introduction