Going Organic: Mobilizing Networks for Environmentally Responsible Food Production, by S. Lockie, K. Lyons, G. Lawrence and D. Halpin (eds)

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Published Jun 4, 2007
Christopher Rosin

Abstract

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How to Cite

[1]
Rosin, C. 2007. Going Organic: Mobilizing Networks for Environmentally Responsible Food Production, by S. Lockie, K. Lyons, G. Lawrence and D. Halpin (eds) . The International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food. 15, 2 (Jun. 2007), 48-51. DOI:https://doi.org/10.48416/ijsaf.v15i2.295.
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References
Buck, D., C. Getz, and J. Guthman. 1997. From farm to table: the organic vegetable commodity chain of Northern California. Sociologia Ruralis 37 (1):3-19.
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Guthman, J. 2004. Agrarian Dreams: The Paradox of Organic Farming in California. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Hall, A., and V. Mogyorody. 2007. Organic farming, gender, and the labor process. Rural Sociology 72 (2):289-316.
Lockie, S., and D. Halpin. 2005. The 'conventionalisation' thesis reconsidered: structural and ideological transformation of Australian organic agriculture. Sociologia Ruralis 45 (4):284-307.
Lyons, K., and G. Lawrence. 2001. Institutionalisation and resistance: organic agriculture in Australia and New Zealand. In Food, Nature and Society: Rural Life in Late Modernity, edited by H. Tovey and M. Blanc. Aldershot: Ashgate.
Pollan, M. 2006. The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin Press.
Rosin, C. and H. Campbell. 2006. “Beyond bifurcation: examining the conventions of organic agriculture in New Zealand”. Paper presented at XVI World Congress of Sociology, Durban, South Africa, July 2006.
Watts, D.C.H., B. Ilbery, and D. Maye. 2005. Making reconnections in agro-food geography: alternative systems of food provision. Progress in Human Geography 29 (1):22-40.
Section
Book Review